ES|QL in the PHP clientedit

This page helps you understand and use ES|QL in the PHP client.

There are two ways to use ES|QL in the PHP client:

  • Use the Elasticsearch ES|QL API directly: This is the most flexible approach, but it’s also the most complex because you must handle results in their raw form. You can choose the precise format of results, such as JSON, CSV, or text.
  • Use ES|QL mapTo($class) helper. This mapper takes care of parsing the raw response and converting into an array of objects. If you don’t specify the class using the $class parameter, the mapper uses stdClass.

How to use the ES|QL APIedit

The ES|QL query API allows you to specify how results should be returned. You can choose a response format such as CSV, text, or JSON, then fine-tune it with parameters like column separators and locale.

The default response from Elasticsearch is a table in JSON, where columns is an array of descriptions and values is an array of rows containing the values.

Here’s an example query and PHP script:

$query = <<<EOD
    FROM books
    | WHERE author == "Stephen King"
    | SORT rating DESC
    | LIMIT 10
EOD;

$result = $client->esql()->query([
    'body' => ['query' => $query]
]);

foreach ($result['values'] as $value) {
    $i=0;
    foreach ($result['columns'] as $col) {
        printf("%s : %s\n", $col['name'], $value[$i++]);
    }
    print("---\n");
}

Here’s the JSON response from Elasticsearch:

{
    "columns": [
        { "name": "author", "type": "text" },
        { "name": "description", "type": "text" },
        { "name": "publisher", "type": "keyword" },
        { "name": "rating", "type": "double" },
        { "name": "title", "type": "text" },
        { "name": "year", "type": "integer" }
    ],
    "values": [
        [
            "Stephen King",
            "The author ...",
            "Turtleback",
            5.0,
            "How writers write",
            2002
        ],
        [
            "Stephen King",
            "In Blockade Billy, a retired coach...",
            "Simon and Schuster",
            5.0,
            "Blockade",
            2010
        ],
        [
            "Stephen King",
            "A chilling collection of twenty horror stories.",
            "Signet Book",
            4.55859375,
            "Night Shift (Signet)",
            1979
        ],
        ...
    ]
}

Using this response, the PHP script (provided above) produces the following output:

author : Stephen King
description : The author ...
publisher : Turtleback
rating : 5.0
title : How writers write
year : 2002
---
author : Stephen King
description : In Blockade Billy, a retired coach...
publisher : Simon and Schuster
rating : 5.0
title : Blockade
year : 2010
---
author : Stephen King
description : A chilling collection of twenty horror stories.
publisher : Signet Book
rating : 4.55859375
title : Night Shift (Signet)
year : 1979
---

The following example gets ES|QL results as CSV and parses them:

$result = $client->esql()->query([
    'format' => 'csv',
    'body' => ['query' => $query]
]);

var_dump($result->asArray());

The response looks something like this:

array(12) {
  [0]=>
  array(6) {
    [0]=>
    string(6) "author"
    [1]=>
    string(11) "description"
    [2]=>
    string(9) "publisher"
    [3]=>
    string(6) "rating"
    [4]=>
    string(5) "title"
    [5]=>
    string(4) "year"
  }
  [1]=>
  array(6) {
    [0]=>
    string(12) "Stephen King"
    [1]=>
    string(249) "The author ..."
    [2]=>
    string(18) "Turtleback"
    [3]=>
    string(3) "5.0"
    [4]=>
    string(8) "How writers write"
    [5]=>
    string(4) "2002"
  }

In the response, the first row contains the column descriptions and the other rows contain the values, using a plain PHP array.

Define your own mappingedit

Although the esql()->query() API covers many use cases, your application might require a custom mapping.

You can map the ES|QL result into an array of objects, using the mapTo() function. Here’s an example:

$result = $client->esql()->query([
    'body' => ['query' => $query]
]);

$books = $result->mapTo(); // Array of stdClass
foreach ($books as $book) {
    printf(
        "%s, %s, %d, Rating: %.2f\n",
        $book->author,
        $book->title,
        $book->year,
        $book->rating
    );
}

You can also specify a class name for the mapping. All the values will be assigned to the properties of the class.

Here’s an example mapper that returns an array of Book objects:

class Book
{
    public string $author;
    public string $title;
    public string $description;
    public int $year;
    public float $rating;
}

$result = $client->esql()->query([
    'body' => ['query' => $query]
]);
$books = $result->mapTo(Book::class); // Array of Book