Event Fieldsedit

The event fields are used for context information about the log or metric event itself.

A log is defined as an event containing details of something that happened. Log events must include the time at which the thing happened. Examples of log events include a process starting on a host, a network packet being sent from a source to a destination, or a network connection between a client and a server being initiated or closed. A metric is defined as an event containing one or more numerical or categorical measurements and the time at which the measurement was taken. Examples of metric events include memory pressure measured on a host, or vulnerabilities measured on a scanned host.

Event Field Detailsedit

FieldDescriptionLevel

event.action

The action captured by the event.

This describes the information in the event. It is more specific than event.category. Examples are group-add, process-started, file-created. The value is normally defined by the implementer.

type: keyword

example: user-password-change

core

event.category

Event category.

This contains high-level information about the contents of the event. It is more generic than event.action, in the sense that typically a category contains multiple actions. Warning: In future versions of ECS, we plan to provide a list of acceptable values for this field, please use with caution.

type: keyword

example: user-management

core

event.created

event.created contains the date/time when the event was first read by an agent, or by your pipeline.

This field is distinct from @timestamp in that @timestamp typically contain the time extracted from the original event.

In most situations, these two timestamps will be slightly different. The difference can be used to calculate the delay between your source generating an event, and the time when your agent first processed it. This can be used to monitor your agent’s or pipeline’s ability to keep up with your event source.

In case the two timestamps are identical, @timestamp should be used.

type: date

core

event.dataset

Name of the dataset.

The concept of a dataset (fileset / metricset) is used in Beats as a subset of modules. It contains the information which is currently stored in metricset.name and metricset.module or fileset.name.

type: keyword

example: stats

core

event.duration

Duration of the event in nanoseconds.

If event.start and event.end are known this value should be the difference between the end and start time.

type: long

core

event.end

event.end contains the date when the event ended or when the activity was last observed.

type: date

extended

event.hash

Hash (perhaps logstash fingerprint) of raw field to be able to demonstrate log integrity.

type: keyword

example: 123456789012345678901234567890ABCD

extended

event.id

Unique ID to describe the event.

type: keyword

example: 8a4f500d

core

event.kind

The kind of the event.

This gives information about what type of information the event contains, without being specific to the contents of the event. Examples are event, state, alarm. Warning: In future versions of ECS, we plan to provide a list of acceptable values for this field, please use with caution.

type: keyword

example: state

extended

event.module

Name of the module this data is coming from.

This information is coming from the modules used in Beats or Logstash.

type: keyword

example: mysql

core

event.original

Raw text message of entire event. Used to demonstrate log integrity.

This field is not indexed and doc_values are disabled. It cannot be searched, but it can be retrieved from _source.

type: keyword

example: Sep 19 08:26:10 host CEF:0|Security| threatmanager|1.0|100| worm successfully stopped|10|src=10.0.0.1 dst=2.1.2.2spt=1232

core

event.outcome

The outcome of the event.

If the event describes an action, this fields contains the outcome of that action. Examples outcomes are success and failure. Warning: In future versions of ECS, we plan to provide a list of acceptable values for this field, please use with caution.

type: keyword

example: success

extended

event.risk_score

Risk score or priority of the event (e.g. security solutions). Use your system’s original value here.

type: float

core

event.risk_score_norm

Normalized risk score or priority of the event, on a scale of 0 to 100.

This is mainly useful if you use more than one system that assigns risk scores, and you want to see a normalized value across all systems.

type: float

extended

event.severity

Severity describes the original severity of the event. What the different severity values mean can very different between use cases. It’s up to the implementer to make sure severities are consistent across events.

type: long

example: 7

core

event.start

event.start contains the date when the event started or when the activity was first observed.

type: date

extended

event.timezone

This field should be populated when the event’s timestamp does not include timezone information already (e.g. default Syslog timestamps). It’s optional otherwise.

Acceptable timezone formats are: a canonical ID (e.g. "Europe/Amsterdam"), abbreviated (e.g. "EST") or an HH:mm differential (e.g. "-05:00").

type: keyword

extended

event.type

Reserved for future usage.

Please avoid using this field for user data.

type: keyword

core