Connect to Your Cluster

To connect to your Elasticsearch cluster, you need to look up the the cluster Endpoint URL:

  1. Log into the Cloud UI, if you aren’t logged in already.
  2. On the Deployments page, select one of your deployments.
  3. Under Endpoints, the endpoint link for Elasticsearch is listed. If you already enabled Kibana, the endpoint where you can access Kibana is listed as well. Click the Elasticsearch endpoint to connect to the cluster in your browser. You should get see a standard message like this:

    {
      "name" : "instance-0000000000",
      "cluster_name" : "85943ce00a934471cb971009e73d2d39",
      "cluster_uuid" : "0z2PsOX1TCGSk7PKgB9ajg",
      "version" : {
        "number" : "2.4.1",
        "build_hash" : "c67dc32e24162035d18d6fe1e952c4cbcbe79d16",
        "build_timestamp" : "2016-09-27T18:57:55Z",
        "build_snapshot" : false,
        "lucene_version" : "5.5.2"
      },
      "tagline" : "You Know, for Search"
    }

    If you are prompted for authentication credentials, you are trying to connect to a cluster that already has Shield enabled or that uses the X-Pack security features. Specify the credentials of a user, such as the default elastic user, to connect.

Currently, we support the following ways of connecting to an Elasticsearch cluster:

RESTful API with JSON over HTTP and HTTPS

Used by the curl command and most programming languages that aren’t Java. To interact with your cluster, use your Elasticsearch cluster endpoint information from the Overview page in the Cloud UI. Port 9200 is used for HTTP connections, ports 9243 and 443 are used for HTTPS. Using HTTPS is generally recommended, as it is more secure.

If this is your first time using Elasticsearch, you can try out some curl commands to become familiar with the basics. If you’re on an operating system like macOS or Linux, you probably already have the curl command installed. For example, to connect to your cluster from the command line over HTTPS with the curl command:

curl -k https://45e366dc3a4142e9a4d6bbe3c7eedee7.192.168.43.10.ip.es.io:9243
{
  "name" : "instance-0000000000",
  "cluster_name" : "45e366dc3a4142e9a4d6bbe3c7eedee7",
  "version" : {
    "number" : "2.3.5",
    "build_hash" : "90f439ff60a3c0f497f91663701e64ccd01edbb4",
    "build_timestamp" : "2016-07-27T10:36:52Z",
    "build_snapshot" : false,
    "lucene_version" : "5.5.0"
  },
  "tagline" : "You Know, for Search"
}

To make this curl command work with your cluster, you need to replace the endpoint URL with your own. +TIP: If you created a cluster on Elasticsearch 5.0 or later or if you already enabled the security features, you must include authentication details with the -u parameter. For example: curl -u elastic:W0UN0Rh9WX8eKeN69grVk3bX https://85943ce00a934471cb971009e73d2d39.us-east-1.aws.found.io:9243.

Java transport client

A good choice if your applications are using Java. This lighter-weight transport client forwards requests to a remote cluster over port 9300, using the native Elasticsearch transport protocol.

To learn more about how you can use the Java transport client, typically in conjunction with X-Pack security features or Shield, see Configure the Java Transport Client.