Starting Elasticsearch

The method for starting Elasticsearch varies depending on how you installed it.

Archive packages (.tar.gz)

If you installed Elasticsearch with a .tar.gz package, you can start Elasticsearch from the command line.

Running Elasticsearch from the command line

Elasticsearch can be started from the command line as follows:

./bin/elasticsearch

By default, Elasticsearch runs in the foreground, prints its logs to the standard output (stdout), and can be stopped by pressing Ctrl-C.

All scripts packaged with Elasticsearch require a version of Bash that supports arrays and assume that Bash is available at /bin/bash. As such, Bash should be available at this path either directly or via a symbolic link.

Running as a daemon

To run Elasticsearch as a daemon, specify -d on the command line, and record the process ID in a file using the -p option:

./bin/elasticsearch -d -p pid

Log messages can be found in the $ES_HOME/logs/ directory.

To shut down Elasticsearch, kill the process ID recorded in the pid file:

kill `cat pid`

The startup scripts provided in the RPM and Debian packages take care of starting and stopping the Elasticsearch process for you.

Archive packages (.zip)

If you installed Elasticsearch on Windows with a .zip package, you can start Elasticsearch from the command line. If you want Elasticsearch to start automatically at boot time without any user interaction, install Elasticsearch as a service.

Running Elasticsearch from the command line

Elasticsearch can be started from the command line as follows:

.\bin\elasticsearch.bat

By default, Elasticsearch runs in the foreground, prints its logs to STDOUT, and can be stopped by pressing Ctrl-C.

Debian packages

Elasticsearch is not started automatically after installation. How to start and stop Elasticsearch depends on whether your system uses SysV init or systemd (used by newer distributions). You can tell which is being used by running this command:

ps -p 1

Running Elasticsearch with SysV init

Use the update-rc.d command to configure Elasticsearch to start automatically when the system boots up:

sudo update-rc.d elasticsearch defaults 95 10

Elasticsearch can be started and stopped using the service command:

sudo -i service elasticsearch start
sudo -i service elasticsearch stop

If Elasticsearch fails to start for any reason, it will print the reason for failure to STDOUT. Log files can be found in /var/log/elasticsearch/.

Running Elasticsearch with systemd

To configure Elasticsearch to start automatically when the system boots up, run the following commands:

sudo /bin/systemctl daemon-reload
sudo /bin/systemctl enable elasticsearch.service

Elasticsearch can be started and stopped as follows:

sudo systemctl start elasticsearch.service
sudo systemctl stop elasticsearch.service

These commands provide no feedback as to whether Elasticsearch was started successfully or not. Instead, this information will be written in the log files located in /var/log/elasticsearch/.

By default the Elasticsearch service doesn’t log information in the systemd journal. To enable journalctl logging, the --quiet option must be removed from the ExecStart command line in the elasticsearch.service file.

When systemd logging is enabled, the logging information are available using the journalctl commands:

To tail the journal:

sudo journalctl -f

To list journal entries for the elasticsearch service:

sudo journalctl --unit elasticsearch

To list journal entries for the elasticsearch service starting from a given time:

sudo journalctl --unit elasticsearch --since  "2016-10-30 18:17:16"

Check man journalctl or https://www.freedesktop.org/software/systemd/man/journalctl.html for more command line options.

Docker images

If you installed a Docker image, you can start Elasticsearch from the command line. There are different methods depending on whether you’re using development mode or production mode. See Running Elasticsearch from the command line.

MSI packages

If you installed Elasticsearch on Windows using the .msi package, you can start Elasticsearch from the command line. If you want it to start automatically at boot time without any user interaction, install Elasticsearch as a Windows service.

Running Elasticsearch from the command line

Once installed, Elasticsearch can be started from the command line, if not installed as a service and configured to start when installation completes, as follows:

.\bin\elasticsearch.exe

The command line terminal will display output similar to the following:

elasticsearch exe

By default, Elasticsearch runs in the foreground, prints its logs to STDOUT in addition to the <cluster name>.log file within LOGSDIRECTORY, and can be stopped by pressing Ctrl-C.

RPM packages

Elasticsearch is not started automatically after installation. How to start and stop Elasticsearch depends on whether your system uses SysV init or systemd (used by newer distributions). You can tell which is being used by running this command:

ps -p 1

Running Elasticsearch with SysV init

Use the chkconfig command to configure Elasticsearch to start automatically when the system boots up:

sudo chkconfig --add elasticsearch

Elasticsearch can be started and stopped using the service command:

sudo -i service elasticsearch start
sudo -i service elasticsearch stop

If Elasticsearch fails to start for any reason, it will print the reason for failure to STDOUT. Log files can be found in /var/log/elasticsearch/.

Running Elasticsearch with systemd

To configure Elasticsearch to start automatically when the system boots up, run the following commands:

sudo /bin/systemctl daemon-reload
sudo /bin/systemctl enable elasticsearch.service

Elasticsearch can be started and stopped as follows:

sudo systemctl start elasticsearch.service
sudo systemctl stop elasticsearch.service

These commands provide no feedback as to whether Elasticsearch was started successfully or not. Instead, this information will be written in the log files located in /var/log/elasticsearch/.

By default the Elasticsearch service doesn’t log information in the systemd journal. To enable journalctl logging, the --quiet option must be removed from the ExecStart command line in the elasticsearch.service file.

When systemd logging is enabled, the logging information are available using the journalctl commands:

To tail the journal:

sudo journalctl -f

To list journal entries for the elasticsearch service:

sudo journalctl --unit elasticsearch

To list journal entries for the elasticsearch service starting from a given time:

sudo journalctl --unit elasticsearch --since  "2016-10-30 18:17:16"

Check man journalctl or https://www.freedesktop.org/software/systemd/man/journalctl.html for more command line options.