Retriesedit

By default, NEST will retry a request as many times as there are nodes in the cluster, that the client knows about.

Retries still respects the request timeout however, meaning if you have a 100 node cluster and a request timeout of 20 seconds, the client will retry as many times as it can before giving up at the request timeout of 20 seconds.

Retry behaviour can be demonstrated using NEST’s Virtual cluster test framework. In the following example, a ten node cluster is defined that always fails on all client calls, except on port 9209

var audit = new Auditor(() => Framework.Cluster
    .Nodes(10)
    .ClientCalls(r => r.FailAlways())
    .ClientCalls(r => r.OnPort(9209).SucceedAlways())
    .StaticConnectionPool()
    .Settings(s => s.DisablePing())
);

The trace of a client call shows that a bad response is received from nodes 9200 to 9208, finally returning a healthy response from the node on port 9209

audit = await audit.TraceCall(
    new ClientCall {
        { BadResponse, 9200 },
        { BadResponse, 9201 },
        { BadResponse, 9202 },
        { BadResponse, 9203 },
        { BadResponse, 9204 },
        { BadResponse, 9205 },
        { BadResponse, 9206 },
        { BadResponse, 9207 },
        { BadResponse, 9208 },
        { HealthyResponse, 9209 }
    }
);

Maximum number of retriesedit

When you have a 100 node cluster for example, you might want to ensure that retries occur only a fixed number of times. This can be done using MaximumRetries(n) on ConnectionSettings

Important

the actual number of requests is initial attempt + set number of retries

var audit = new Auditor(() => Framework.Cluster
    .Nodes(10)
    .ClientCalls(r => r.FailAlways())
    .ClientCalls(r => r.OnPort(9209).SucceedAlways())
    .StaticConnectionPool()
    .Settings(s => s.DisablePing().MaximumRetries(3)) 
);

audit = await audit.TraceCall(
    new ClientCall {
        { BadResponse, 9200 },
        { BadResponse, 9201 },
        { BadResponse, 9202 },
        { BadResponse, 9203 },
        { MaxRetriesReached } 
    }
);

Set the maximum number of retries to 3

The client call trace returns an MaxRetriesReached audit after the initial attempt and the number of retries allowed

In our previous example we simulated very fast failures, but in the real world, a call might take upwards of a second.

In this next example, we simulate a particularly heavy search that takes 10 seconds to fail, and set a request timeout of 20 seconds. We see that the request is tried twice and gives up before a third call is attempted, since the call takes 10 seconds and thus can be tried twice (initial call and one retry) before the request timeout.

var audit = new Auditor(() => Framework.Cluster
    .Nodes(10)
    .ClientCalls(r => r.FailAlways().Takes(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(10)))
    .ClientCalls(r => r.OnPort(9209).SucceedAlways())
    .StaticConnectionPool()
    .Settings(s => s.DisablePing().RequestTimeout(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(20)))
);

audit = await audit.TraceCall(
    new ClientCall {
        { BadResponse, 9200 },
        { BadResponse, 9201 },
        { MaxTimeoutReached }
    }
);

Maximum retry timeoutedit

If you set a smaller request timeout you might not want it to also affect the retry timeout. In cases like this, you can configure the MaxRetryTimeout separately. Here we simulate calls taking 3 seconds, a request timeout of 2 seconds and a max retry timeout of 10 seconds. We should see 5 attempts to perform this query, testing that our request timeout cuts the query off short and that our max retry timeout of 10 seconds wins over the configured request timeout

var audit = new Auditor(() => Framework.Cluster
    .Nodes(10)
    .ClientCalls(r => r.FailAlways().Takes(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(3)))
    .ClientCalls(r => r.OnPort(9209).FailAlways())
    .StaticConnectionPool()
    .Settings(s => s.DisablePing().RequestTimeout(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(2)).MaxRetryTimeout(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(10)))
);

audit = await audit.TraceCall(
    new ClientCall {
        { BadResponse, 9200 },
        { BadResponse, 9201 },
        { BadResponse, 9202 },
        { BadResponse, 9203 },
        { BadResponse, 9204 },
        { MaxTimeoutReached }
    }
);

If your retry policy expands beyond the number of available nodes, the client won’t retry the same node twice

var audit = new Auditor(() => Framework.Cluster
    .Nodes(2)
    .ClientCalls(r => r.FailAlways().Takes(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(3)))
    .ClientCalls(r => r.OnPort(9209).SucceedAlways())
    .StaticConnectionPool()
    .Settings(s => s.DisablePing().RequestTimeout(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(2)).MaxRetryTimeout(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(10)))
);

audit = await audit.TraceCall(
    new ClientCall {
        { BadResponse, 9200 },
        { BadResponse, 9201 },
        { MaxRetriesReached }
    }
);

This makes setting any retry setting on a single node connection pool a no-op by design! Connection pooling and failover is all about trying to fail sanely whilst still utilizing the available resources and not giving up on the fail fast principle; It is NOT a mechanism for forcing requests to succeed.

var audit = new Auditor(() => Framework.Cluster
    .Nodes(10)
    .ClientCalls(r => r.FailAlways().Takes(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(3)))
    .ClientCalls(r => r.OnPort(9209).SucceedAlways())
    .SingleNodeConnection()
    .Settings(s => s.DisablePing().MaximumRetries(10))
);

audit = await audit.TraceCall(
    new ClientCall {
        { BadResponse, 9200 }
    }
);