periodedit

This filtertype will iterate over the actionable list and match indices or snapshots based on whether they fit within the given time range. They will remain in, or be removed from the actionable list based on the value of exclude.

 - filtertype: period
   period_type: relative
   source: name
   range_from: -1
   range_to: -1
   timestring: '%Y.%m.%d'
   unit: weeks
   week_starts_on: sunday
Note

Empty values and commented lines will result in the default value, if any, being selected. If a setting is set, but not used by a given filtertype, it may generate an error.

Relative Periodsedit

A relative period will be reckoned relative to execution time, unless an epoch timestamp is provided. Reckoning is truncated to the most recent whole unit, where a unit can be one of seconds, minutes, hours, days, weeks, months, or years. For example, if I selected hours as my unit, and I began execution at 02:35, then the point of reckoning would be 02:00. This is relatively easy with days, months, and years, but slightly more complicated with weeks. Some users may wish to reckon weeks by the ISO standard, which starts weeks on Monday. Others may wish to use Sunday as the first day of the week. Both are acceptable options with the period filter. The default behavior for weeks is to have Sunday be the start of the week. This can be overridden with week_starts_on as follows:

 - filtertype: period
   period_type: relative
   source: name
   range_from: -1
   range_to: -1
   timestring: '%Y.%m.%d'
   unit: weeks
   week_starts_on: monday

range_from and range_to are counters of whole units. A negative number indicates a whole unit in the past, while a positive number indicates a whole unit in the future. A 0 indicates the present unit. With such a timeline mentality, it is relatively easy to create a date range that will meet your needs.

If the time of execution time is 2017-04-03T13:45:23.831, this table will help you figure out what the previous whole unit, current unit, and next whole unit will be, in ISO8601 format.

unit -1 0 +1

hours

2017-04-03T12:00:00

2017-04-03T13:00:00

2017-04-03T14:00:00

days

2017-04-02T00:00:00

2017-04-03T00:00:00

2017-04-04T00:00:00

weeks sun

2017-03-26T00:00:00

2017-04-02T00:00:00

2017-04-09T00:00:00

weeks mon

2017-03-27T00:00:00

2017-04-03T00:00:00

2017-04-10T00:00:00

months

2017-03-01T00:00:00

2017-04-01T00:00:00

2017-05-01T00:00:00

years

2016-01-01T00:00:00

2017-01-01T00:00:00

2018-01-01T00:00:00

Ranges must be from older dates to newer dates, or smaller numbers (including negative numbers) to larger numbers or Curator will return an exception.

An example period filter demonstrating how to select all daily indices by timestring found in the index name from last month might look like this:

 - filtertype: period
   period_type: relative
   source: name
   range_from: -1
   range_to: -1
   timestring: '%Y.%m.%d'
   unit: months

Having range_from and range_to both be the same value will mean that only that whole unit will be selected, in this case, a month.

Important

range_from and range_to are required for the relative pattern type.

Absolute Periodsedit

 - filtertype: period
   period_type: absolute
   source: name
   timestring: '%Y.%m.%d'
   unit: months
   date_from: 2017.01
   date_from_format: '%Y.%m'
   date_to: 2017.01
   date_to_format: '%Y.%m'

In addition to relative periods, you can define absolute periods. These are defined as the period between the date_from and the date_to. For example, if date_from and date_to are both 2017.01, and unit is months, all indices with a name, creation_date, or stats_result (depending on the value of source) within the month of January 2017 will match.

The date_from is used to establish the beginning of the time period, regardless of whether date_from_format is in hours, and the indices you are trying to filter are in weeks or months. The format and date of date_from will simply set the beginning of the time period.

The date_to, date_to_format, and unit work in conjunction to select the end date. For example, if my date_to were 2017.04, and date_to_format is %Y.%m to properly parse that date, it would follow that unit would be months.

Important

The period filter is smart enough to calculate months and years properly. If unit is not months or years, then your date range will be unit seconds more than the beginning of the date_from date, minus 1 second, according to this table:

units are calculated as follows:

UnitSecondsNote

seconds

1

One second

minutes

60

Calculated as 60 seconds

hours

3600

Calculated as 60 minutes (60*60)

days

86400

Calculated as 24 hours (24*60*60)

weeks

604800

Calculated as 7 days (7*24*60*60)

months

2592000

Calculated as 30 days (30*24*60*60)

years

31536000

Calculated as 365 days (365*24*60*60)

Specific date ranges can be captured with up to whole second resolution:

 - filtertype: period
   period_type: absolute
   source: name
   timestring: '%Y.%m.%d.%H'
   unit: seconds
   date_from: 2017-01-01T00:00:00
   date_from_format: '%Y-%m-%dT%H:%M:%S'
   date_to: 2017-01-01T12:34:56
   date_to_format: '%Y-%m-%dT%H:%M:%S'

This example will capture indices with an hourly timestamp in their name that fit between the date_from and date_to timestamps.

The identifiers that Curator currently recognizes include:

UnitValueNote

%Y

4 digit year

%G

4 digit year

use instead of %Y when doing ISO Week calculations

%y

2 digit year

%m

2 digit month

%W

2 digit week of the year

%V

2 digit week of the year

use instead of %W when doing ISO Week calculations

%d

2 digit day of the month

%H

2 digit hour

24 hour notation

%M

2 digit minute

%S

2 digit second

%j

3 digit day of the year

Required settingsedit

Dependent settingsedit

Optional settingsedit